A few good men

Posted on July 25th, 2007 in Politics by Robert Miller

If we are ever to get off our trajectory as the world’s only superpower, and settle for an orbit closer to our innate self, reduce spending on our expensive military toys, stop the weaponization of space, eliminate torture as a national policy, begin to think about the world’s problems as if they could be solved by peaceful strategies rather than the invasion of other countries and begin to change our economy from its current base as Military Keynesianism (Reaganomics), we will need a few good men. Perhaps we found one in Steven Abrahams , a former military intelligence officer and lawyer in civilian life who was a member of the Pentagon unit to oversee Guantanamo Bay hearings which were initiated to determine prisoner status beginning in 2004. He was expected, like any other officer, to rubber stamp whatever was going on in the interests of national security and harmony within the military and, as he himself pointed out, he assumed that all Guantanamo prisoners were there for good reasons.

Is it blind justice or justice blinded?

Posted on July 24th, 2007 in Culture,Politics by Robert Miller

In an earlier article I pointed out how sociologist Glenn Loury proposed a correlation between our escalated rate of incarceration in this country and its source of growth related to racist policies. So if we are issuing more “GO TO JAIL” cards, how easy is it to land on that spot and get one. If it’s easier to land in jail, it follows that we must have lowered our standards of evidence and trial procedures to make it that way, but no one has really presented serious case studies that might shed light on this problem, despite the fact that retroactive DNA evidence has resulted in the release of many prisoners who were innocently incarcerated. Have you noticed that the overwhelming number of prisoners released by DNA evidence are black? Have you seen a single white person released by retro DNA evidence?

What the U.S. did to Haiti in 2004

Posted on July 23rd, 2007 in Books,Politics by Robert Miller

Does America ever overthrow elected democracies to install or re-install repressive dictatorships? Chalmers Johnson, in his book Nemesis , points out that during the Cold War there was not a single example of the CIA working to install a democratic government, whereas their efforts were unyielding in the support of repressive dictatorships often under the false disguise of an anti-communist strategy. The real emphasis was often to maintain American Corporate Hegemony. But there is a more recent example that has now been clarified by Randall Robinson in his new book “An Unbroken Agony: Haiti, From Revolution to the Kidnapping of a President.” He is founder and past president of TransAfrica and the author of numerous bestsellers including “The Debt”, “The Reckoning”, and “Defending the Spirit.” His website is RandallRobinson.com. He has been recently interviewed on C-Span by Brian Lamb and on Democracy Now with Amy Goodman. Robinson is living as an expatriot in St. Kitts in the Caribbean, but has laid out how and why the U.S. Army, on orders from G.W. Bush, with the full participation of Rumsfeld’s military and Colin Powell as Secretary of State, kidnapped democratically elected Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in February 2004, and whisked him off to an African State to install Boniface Alexandre as the new president.

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